Oregon Tax Filing

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Filing Your Taxes in Oregon

Filing taxes is always a little frustrating no matter which way you look at it and sometimes you need a little help. Which form do I file with my return for which state? How do I find out my residency status? How does my residency status affect my tax return? You can find the answers to these questions and more here to help make filing your taxes as easy as 1-2-3!

Make sure that you file before April 15th to avoid any problems.

Couples filing as registered domestic partners in Oregon can file as married, either separately or jointly, but are not allowed to file as single.

Online Tax Software: Let the Computer Figure it Out!

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Oregon Tax Forms

How Do I Determine My Residency Status?

The four groups of people who have to file income taxes in Oregon are: Oregon residents, part-year Oregon residents, people who live in Oregon but work in another state, people who live in another state and work in Oregon and people who sold property in Oregon that tax year.

Oregon Residents

Oregon residents are people who have lived in Oregon all year or for more than 200 days in a year. If your gross income in the previous year was higher than the amount in the table in the Oregon Income Tax Full-Year Resident Instructions, you will need to file an Oregon state income tax return using Form-40. You can find more information about filing Oregon Form-40 by downloading the Oregon Income Tax Full-Year Resident Instructions above.

Part-Year Residents

Part-year Oregon residents are a bit more complicated. If you moved to or from Oregon within the last tax year, you are a part-year Oregon resident. All of your income will be taxed for the time you were an Oregon resident, even if it was earned outside of Oregon. All income earned within Oregon will also be taxed, even if you lived elsewhere. If your income is greater than the amount in the income table in the Oregon Income Tax Part-Year Resident/Nonresident Instructions, and you lived in Oregon for part of the year, you have to file an Oregon part-year resident return using Form-40P. You can find more information on how to fill out Form-40P by downloading the Oregon Income Tax Part-Year Resident/Nonresident Instructions above.

Live in Oregon, Work Out of State

If you are an Oregon resident (see above) but worked outside of Oregon, you are required to pay taxes in Oregon on that income. Oregon takes state income tax on any and all income that you made, even if it was out of state. You might also get taxed by the state in which you earned the income. You can avoid dual taxation; Oregon offers a credit for residents working out of state. You can find out more about these tax credits and whether you qualify at: http://www.oregon.gov/DOR/PERTAX/2009_piti/credits_inc_tax_paid_another_state.shtml.

Work in Oregon, Live Out of State

If you resided outside of Oregon all year, then you are of course, not an Oregon resident. You are only allowed to earn a certain amount of income in Oregon as a nonresident and if you exceed that limit (see the income table in the Oregon Income Tax Part-Year Resident/Nonresident Instructions), you will need to file a nonresident income tax return in Oregon. You can find more information on what Oregon considers taxable income in the Oregon Income Tax Part-Year Resident/Nonresident Instructions. Nonresidents file their income tax return with Oregon using Form-40N. You can find more information on how to fill out Form-40N in the Oregon Income Tax Part-Year Resident/Nonresident Instructions which you can download above.

If you sold property in Oregon while not an Oregon resident, the same rules apply as those for out of state income. You will have to file a Form-40N and declare your nonresident income. Again, refer to the income table in the Oregon Income Tax Part-Year Resident/Nonresident Instructions to determine if the amount you earned on the sale is high enough to require declaring. You can find more information on Form-40N in the Oregon Income Tax Part-Year Resident/Nonresident Instructions which you can download above.